4 Reasons You Should Make Humor Part Of Your Advertising

We’re surrounded. There’s no escape. Everywhere we look we’re being marketed to, and it’s overwhelming to the point of paralysis. If we aren’t being bombarded by ads while watching TV, listening to a podcast, or driving down a highway, take a look at your phone and scroll through your Instagram feed for ten seconds, and there’s another ad. How do we cut through the clutter and get potential customers to stop their scrolling long enough to absorb the content of our ads? Make a connection, and a simple way to connect with another human is through laughter. No matter your product or service, if you can get a laugh out of someone, whether they’re looking to buy what you’re selling or not, you’ve created the opening stages of a relationship with that person. Eventually, when they’re looking for what you’re selling, guess who they’ll remember more than that dry, “Buy our product… pleeeeease” desperation of your competitor.

Why is humor such a powerful tool in advertising? In his book, The Humor Advantage, Michael Kerr lists four reasons:

1. It helps attract attention

Like I said above, are you more likely to skip an ad when it makes you laugh, or are you more likely to skip an ad when it’s evidently trying to sell something to you?

2. It can enhance memory and comprehension

A study done at San Diego State University found that the students of professors who incorporated relevant humor into their lessons scored significantly higher than the other students. When teachers were trained to use at least 3 on-topic jokes per lesson, learning increased by more than 15% and these improvements lasted throughout the entire semester. Why? Humor forces the mind to work more than if the ideas were presented in a straightforward manner. Your brain has to connect ideas, and in doing so, creates a longer lasting impact. This is why Geico commercials don’t just say, “15 minutes saves 15% or more on car insurance.” They add a funny gag with a quick set-up and punchline so your brain makes a connection, then they hit you with that tagline. It’s genius.

3. In some situations, it’s more persuasive

A Journal of General Psychology study found that under certain conditions, humor can be highly persuasive when delivering a message that people can disagree with. Why? Because humor serves as a distraction and can reveal a new perspective, it opens our minds to allow new information in. With this in mind, perhaps those looking to start a movement on, say, climate change should ease up on instill fear as a motivating tactic, and instead find what’s funny about maintaining the status quo on carbon emissions. Which do you think will be more effective at swaying the people who disagree with their position?

4. It tends to enhance the likability and credibility of the source

It’s basic human behavior: if someone makes us laugh, we look forward to seeing and spending time with that person. When our brains associate the release of dopamine through laughter with another person, they’ll drive us to want to interact with that person for more dopamine. A study in the magazine Psychological Reports found that women who overhear men tell funny jokes found them to be smarter and more attractive than men who don’t. Do you hear that, advertisers? Not only can your humor attract potential customers and clients, you just may find your future wife too… That’s not the point I want you to take from this.

Set yourself apart the next time you set up an ad campaign for your business and incorporate some humor. For help in doing this, check out Water Cooler Comedy’s Funny Promotional Video package here: https://www.watercoolercomedy.org/packages

3 Ways to Maximize Your Guest Speaker’s Impact

You’ve been tasked with finding, vetting, and hiring a guest speaker for your meeting, conference, or seminar and you want to make sure the audience gets the most out of the experience. There are an endless supply of speakers you can hire, but you’ve narrowed it down to the one you think best fits the bill. You’ve seen many speakers – some good, some not-so-good, so you want to be sure the audience receives the presentation as both you and the speaker intend. Here are a few ways to make sure you and your speaker knock it out of the park.

1. Be clear with your audience what they should expect

Make sure the speaker has sent you a summary that explains the premise and purpose of the presentation – complete with audience takeaways, a concise biography, a link to their website, and a video link. Then, post all of these to an email to your potential attendees or some sort of event page, that way the audience has is fully aware what is about to happen. As a speaker who employs humor in a way that pulls no punches on the current status quo of the modern workplace, I have received feedback from previous clients stating the audience was offended by some of my content. Each time, the client provided merely my name and the title of the presentation without any further context. Being clear about what people should expect will save the audience from attending a presentation that may be uncomfortable, uninteresting, and irrelevant to them, while saving you the hassle of negative feedback along the lines of, “The speaker is not what I expected. Wish he had told fewer jokes.”

2.  Allow the speaker to use his or her own A/V upon request

If the speaker asks to use their own computer for a slideshow, it may be out of the ordinary for you, but there is a good reason why they made this request. LET THEM USE THEIR OWN EQUIPMENT. Every time past clients have requested I run my slideshow off of their computer, I have run into technical difficulties. I have had downloaded fonts I use in slideshows get reformatted on the new computer, jamming the on-screen text into a jumbled mess. Once, the font I used got reformatted into Wingdings on the new computer, so a very information-heavy slide looked like a Hieroglyphic-laden joke and I had to take the time to explain that it wasn’t intended that way. My presentations also incorporate music, which, when I have to run them off of another computer, I have to disrupt the flow of the presentation to play the music off of my phone.  My presentation files are also take up hundreds of megabytes in storage space and have frozen and even crashed a previous client’s PC laptop. I warned them, but they insisted. This note is for your convenience as much as that of the speaker. It may take a moment to switch the projector from your slideshow to the speaker’s, but I promise it’ll be worth it in the end. Put your A/V specialist (or the guy who knows what plugs go where) in contact with the speaker and allow them to communicate their needs. Remember to have the speaker arrive early.

3. Do not introduce the speaker while the audience is eating

Do you want your audience to get the most out of your speaker? Of course you do, but it’s tough to truly place 100% of your focus on the information the speaker is sharing when they’ve got a build-your-own taco in front of them. I get it, you want to kill two birds with one stone and maximize your time, but it might be more effective to ask the speaker to shorten their talk rather than have the audience trying to saw through their chicken marsala, pass the bread, and take notes on effective ways to communicate. Comedians hate performing while servers pass the checks – it’s a distraction to both the performers and audience – and the same goes to event servers dropping off the dessert while the speaker is trying to list ideas for building a better company culture. I open my presentations with a bit where I have attendees close their eyes and imagine themselves in their happy place. When watching the video of the event, I noticed about half of the attendees blatantly ignore this and continue eating. The follow-up punchline died on stage, and, because the opening is vital to the rest of the presentation, I never established a connection with a majority of the audience. Be sure the venue gets the main course on the table at least 15 minutes before the presentation begins, read the room, and introduce the speaker once desserts have been dropped off.